More Cooking Science And Mythbusting

You may have thought you left chemistry and physics behind in school, but everytime you set foot into the kitchen or out into the yard, you launch chemical and physical reactions. Understanding what happens when heat hits meat is what will allow you to become a better cook. If you are the type who asks "why" this section is for you.

"Every meal is a chemistry and physics experiment."

Meathead
spatchcocked chicken
Spatchcocking, or butterflying, a whole turkey, chicken or any other bird is a great way to make moist, delicious birds that are browned all over and evenly cooked in less time. It's a simple matter of cutting out the bird's backbone, a deboning process that is easy and painless with good kitchen or poultry shears. read more
pink juices
Many recipes say to cook poultry 'until the juices run clear'. If you do, you could end up overcooking your poultry or spending the night on the toilet. Find out the real science behind pink juices, undercooked chicken, safe doneness temperatures, salmonella, and why the best tool for food safety is a good thermometer. read more
beer cooler faux cambro
How do caterers hold cooked meats safely for so long? It's called a hotbox or Cambro and you can make a faux Cambro with a simple beer cooler. It's the secret to resting large cuts of BBQ like brisket, pork butts, and whole turkeys while keeping them warm and transporting them. Here's how to set up a faux Cambo. read more
pounded chicken vs. unpounded
Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are among the most popular meats in America. But they have a problem. One side is thick and one is thin, so they don't cook evenly. Pounding chicken breasts flat solves a lot of cooking and serving problems. Here's how to make an even piece of meat quickly and easily. read more
brisket smoke ring
Smoked meats often have a pink layer below the surface called the smoke ring. But you don't need smoke to create it! It is created by myoglobin, a protein in meat, reacting with combustion gases. Read on to learn how removing the fat cap from meat, keeping the meat moist, and cooking low and slow create the smoke ring. read more
thanksgiving dinner table
So you're cooking for a crowd. How much food do you need? Here's how to plan for a party or special occasion, including some basic rules of thumb and tips on how to handle dietary restrictions, how to prep ahead, and how to calculate the right amount of food so no one goes hungry. read more
pork butt barbecue in stall
Large hunks of barbecued meat have this nasty habit of rising to 150F inside and then stopping there. It's called the stall or plateau, and it can last for hours. Science says the stall is caused by evaporative cooling. The Texas crutch is a simple trick that can help you power you through the stall. read more
Smoking Ribeye
What is the right cooking temperature for barbecue? It depends. Not all food should be cooked low and slow or hot and fast. Sometimes, a combination of both is best, as seen in the reverse sear and in sous-vide-que. Read more about 2-zone cooking and when to grill with the lid up or down for perfectly cooked BBQ. read more
We all strive to create tender, juicy, and flavorful meat, but we also want it safe. Monitoring the internal temperature is the best way to have the best of both worlds. Here's the ultimate guide to understanding proper cooking temperatures and food safety to ensure that your meat is cooked perfectly every time. read more
image of heat transference in four potatoes
Can you make a potato cook faster by driving a nail through the center? In theory, the metal nail conducts heat through the potato, speeding up the cooking. To test the theory, our AmazingRibs.com science advisor, Professor Greg Blonder, ran a simple experiment. The results may surprise you. read more

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