BBQ & Grilling Technique, Science, And Mythbusting (cont'd)

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Stop trying to get perfect grill marks! Yes, grill marks make us drool, but they are a sign of lost potential. Fact: the most flavorful meat has the most browning across its entire surface, not just a few browned stripes. Let's bust that myth. Read on to find out how to make the most flavorful browned crust on meat. read more
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Here's everything you need to know about cooking with cast iron on your grill, in a campfire, and in your kitchen. Learn the science behind cast-iron skillets, Dutch ovens, and griddles, why they work so well, and how to season, clean, and repair vintage cast-iron pans. Try some of our favorite cast iron recipes too! read more
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Looking for something new to barbecue? You'll love big cluster mushrooms cooked low and slow with this innovative press-and-sear technique. read more
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Recipes often tell you to cook food until it is browned. Why? Browning is flavor! The most important chemical changes in food occur when heat initiates the Maillard reaction and caramelization. These processes make food GBD: Golden Brown and Delicious. Read on to find out how it all works. read more
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Bark is that sweet, rich, crusty surface on low and slow cooked meat, and for many of us, the best part. It is part pellicle and part spice crust, but how does it form? The Maillard reaction, polymerization, and evaporation are key. Find out how to get better bark on your brisket, ribs, and pork shoulder. read more
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Sorry folks: searing meat to seal in the juices is a myth. Of course, searing meat has other benefits, most notably creating the delicious flavors of browned meat! Here are the facts about meat juices, searing, browning, and a better way to sear your meat called the reverse sear. read more
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There are times when basting helps and times when it hurts. Find out how applying liquid to the surface of meat with basting, mopping and spritzing may inhibit the formation of your crust or bark and lengthen cooking time while attracting smoke and improving flavor. It depends on what you're cooking and for how long. read more
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The fat on the outside of meat does not melt and penetrate the muscle fibers making the meat moister. That is a myth. Here's the science on different types of fat, what happens as fat heats and melts, and the best way to trim meats before cooking to create the most delicious browned bark or crust. read more
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Here's what you need to know about when and how to use BBQ sauce. There are tricks to know, including how much sauce to use on smoked ribs, pulled pork, and other barbecue. Find out when not to apply BBQ sauce, how to avoid burnt sauce, how to use a kitchen torch, and how to sizzle, glaze, paint on barbecue sauce. read more
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Large hunks of barbecued meat have this nasty habit of rising to 150°F inside and then stopping there. It's called the stall or plateau, and it can last for hours. Science says the stall is caused by evaporative cooling. The Texas crutch is a simple trick that can help you power you through the stall. read more
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Conventional wisdom says you should keep the grill lid closed at all times. What do precise measurements tell us? It turns out that opening the lid may not have a huge effect on the grill's ambient temperature. Learn about all the variables and whether or not a steady temperature makes a big difference anyway. read more
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Here's a useful technique for tenderizing, moisturizing, and speeding cooking by wrapping meat in aluminum foil for an hour or two. The Texas crutch beats the stall, in which meat stops cooking during barbecuing, sometimes for hours. This simple trick works for brisket, pork shoulder and ribs on any smoker or grill. read more
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We're crazy for incredible BBQ ribs and have plenty of rib recipes, smoking techniques, equipment recommendations, and mythbusting secrets throughout the site. But we know sometimes you just want to see the highlight reel instead of watching the whole game. No problem. Here are the 8 key steps you need to take. read more
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Does poking meat drain way all its juices? No. A piece of meat is not a water balloon. If you test it with a thermometer, all its juices will not drain away. In fact, using a thermometer is the only sure-fire way to judge the internal doneness temperature of meat. Find out why in this mythbusting article. read more
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Is meat color an accurate indicator of doneness? A lot of cooks cut into meat and judge doneness by the meat color. But the color of meat changes when it is exposed to oxygen. The only reliable way to judge doneness is with a good digital thermometer. Here's everything you need to know about meat color and doneness. read more

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Meathead Goldwyn

Meathead is the founder and publisher of AmazingRibs.com, and is also known as the site's Hedonism Evangelist and BBQ Whisperer. He is also the author of "Meathead, The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling", a New York Times Best Seller and named one of the "100 Best Cookbooks of All Time" by Southern Living.

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