Big Green Egg Large Ceramic Cooker

Big Green Egg, Inc.

The Big Green Egg is the most popular of the ceramic cookers, and it was the first to effectively penetrate the US market. It has a devoted following of enthusiastic users.

In addition to several sizes of cookers, they sell various accessories and seasonings. They are not sold at big box stores or online but are available at a large number of independent outlets.

For many, the Big Green Egg is the Weber of Kamados. They introduced Kamado cookers to the USA and are often viewed as the industry standard. The Large Egg is big enough for a 20 pound turkey and has an 18" diameter grate. Made in Mexico the BGE design is simple, it is built to last, and it has a limited lifetime warranty.

big green egg with flame shooting out the domeRound Kamados work as good as or better than standard charcoal grills for most recipes. They are, by design, excellent ovens and smokers because once the ceramic settles at the desired temperature, it stays there for hours. Eggs make great pizza ovens. Remove the grate and you can do Brazilian and Tandoori style cooking on long skewers, all standing vertically in a circle around the small, superhot fire. Open the bottom damper, remove the top damper completely, and turn your Egg into a roaring furnace with a column of flame shooting out the dome for searing thin steaks and burgers. (Shown right. Use caution if you try this method.)

 

But they cannot be set up for true 2-zone cooking, an essential technique easily done on other charcoal grills by piling coal to one side to create a direct and indirect zone simultaneously. A few exceptions exist, such as Primo's Oval Kamados. Click here to read more about Kamado and ceramic grills and smokers.

2-zones provide rapid temperature control, enabling cooks to slide foods back and forth from cool to hot zones for crisping skin and reverse sear steaks. Most Kamado aficionados concede the best way to create different heat zones in their cookers is moving foods closer to or further from the coal. This is typically accomplished using the many accessories available from BGE and third party manufacturers. One useful device that is a match made in heaven for kamados is the BBQ Dragon, a well-made, battery operated, clip on, variable speed fan that can convert a charcoal bed from quiet gray to rip roaring red hot in a matter of minutes. Very good for switching gears from low and slow to searing hot. We recommend using an ancillary charcoal grill for direct heat when doing 2-zone recipes. It can be a lot less expensive than buying a bunch of add-ons and much easier than trying to move hot, greasy parts around in the middle of a cook.

There is one indispensable device called the "Plate Setter" for all sizes except the Mini Egg. It's a flat ceramic disk that sits directly over the charcoal. It absorbs and radiates heat so you have indirect radiant heat, but there is still no way to get convection heat as you can by building the fire on the side of a Primo Oval. The plate also prevents grease from spattering during the cook, which many believe produces a clean, less bitter flavor.

The exterior has an easy-to-clean green glaze bonded to the ceramic. The manufacturer claims that the modern ceramic material will not become brittle and can withstand 2,000°F, but we wouldn't recommend knocking it over whether hot or cold. Ceramic is very susceptible to cracking.

The base holds an inner fire pit in the bottom of which is a charcoal grate. There's a sliding damper on the outside for air to enter below the charcoal.

Above the fire pit is a fire ring, and that's where the cooking grate rests. There are two metal bands that go around the top outside circumference of the base and the bottom of the lid and they are hinged together. Optional side tables can be attached to the bands. The lips of the lid and the base are covered with special felt for a good tight seal. On top of the lid there is a topper that controls exhaust and an optional "Dual Function Metal Top" with a dial that allows for more precise air control.

The vents can be left open for hotter cooking, or closed nearly shut to keep your charcoal smoldering for hours. Some owners claim if you set it up properly you will not need to add charcoal for 24 hours during a typical 225°F cooking session. You could put a pork shoulder in with a small amount of lit charcoal on top of some unlit charcoal, close it, and come back in 12 hours to a succulent clod of pulled pork. If you do have to add charcoal, you must lift out the meat and the grate to do it. That's a bit of a pain.

There's a dedicated forum of BGE users and it has a wealth of information like this: "Tighten the bolts on the stands after the Egg has been used five times" and "If you have a problem with grease sticking the felt shut when it's cold, slip a Weber paraffin charcoal lighter cube in the bottom and wait for the warmth to release the opening. Then change the gaskets."

Replacements for all parts are easily available. On the negative side, we have heard that gaskets need to be replaced after a few years, parts are expensive, and that customer service could be better.

Eggs are not sold on the internet and their prices are not quoted at their website, but they have a lot of dealers coast to coast. Our posted price does not include a stand.

Price: 
$849
Primary Function: 
Grill
Smoker
Egg or Kamado Style
Combination Grill & Smoker
Fuel: 
Charcoal
Primary Capacity: 
262 square inches
Made in the USA: 
No
Review Method:

Cooked On It

We have hands-on experience testing this product. We have also gathered info from the manufacturer, owners and other reliable sources.

Search Our Reviews and Ratings

Click Search to see all our Reviews and Ratings. Use the filters below to refine your search.

*Based on 4" raw burger with 1/2" space on all sides

Please read this before posting a comment or question

grouchy?

1) Please try the table of contents or the search box at the top of every page before you cry for help.

2) Try to post your question to the appropriate page.

3) Tell us everything we need to know to help such as the type of cooker and thermometer. Dial thermometers are often off by as much as 50°F so if you are not using a good digital thermometer we probably can't help you with time and temp questions. Please read this article about thermometers.

4) If you are a member of the Pitmaster Club, your comments login is probably different.

Moderators

  Max
  Clint
  Jerod
  Huskee
  Henrik
  Browne
 Click to Show Comments or Add Your Own