New Orleans Barbecue Sauce

"New Orleans is like the bad-kid island in Pinocchio." Jonah Hill

In New Orleans (pronounced NAW-lins), barbecue shrimp are pan seared or baked with a barbecue sauce made with butter, garlic, Louisiana hot sauce, and lagniappe (a little something extra). Technically, since there is no smoke in the process, so it really isn't barbecue, but there's no reason why we can't use this wonderful sauce on grilled shrimp, andouille or other sausages, pork chops, pulled pork, or chicken. This is a runny sauce with a lot of butter in it, and if you paint it on the meat most of it will run off and cause deadly flareups if you put it over direct heat, and shrimp likes direct heat. So the best technique is to cook the meat and then dunk it in the sauce and serve. Putting it on French bread is the best way to use it since the sauce will soak into the bread. In fact that is how it is used in New Orleans, to make the classic barbecue shrimp and andouille po-boy.

Makes. Enough for 6 (6") po-boys.

Takes. 30 minutes or less.

Keeps. Because it has butter, you should use it within a month.

Ingredients

4 ounces (1 stick) butter

3 cloves fresh garlic, peeled and minced or pressed

1 tablespoon Meathead's Memphis Dust

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon Louisiana hot sauce

About the hot sauce. Use your favorite brand. Tabasco is from Louisiana, so it would be a good choice. If your andouille is hot, you might want to skip the hot sauce. If you are from New Orleans, crank up the heat!

Do this

1) Pour the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir fry for about 1 minute, no longer or it will brown and get bitter.

2) Add the Meathead's Memphis Dust and cook for another 30 seconds to extract the flavors. Add the lemon juice, hot sauce, and stir gently until it dissolves and blends in. Take the pan off the heat. Taste and add more heat if you wish. In N'orleans they like everything hot, but it will not be so hot when you use it on meat.

new orleans sauce

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