How To Make A Cured Smoked Ham From Scratch

Curing meats such as bacon, ham, or pastrami is fun and the results are often better than storebought. But curing is very different from any other recipe because you are using a preservative, sodium nitrite. You must read and thoroughly understand my article on the Science Of Curing Meats before attempting to cure meat or before you ask any questions. That page also contains info on scaling the recipe up or down.

Want to create a smoked ham at home but aren't sure how to do it? The key to creating a ham like the ones you normally purchase during the holidays is the curing process. Without it you won't achieve the same flavor or deep red color of a traditional holiday ham.

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finished ham

This recipe will help you create a smoked ham at home. Every animal is different, so you need to use the Curing Calculator on this page for precise amounts since it is unlikely your ham will be exactly the same as this one. 

Course. Dinner. Entree.

Cuisine. American.

Makes. Enough to feed at least 10 to 15 people

Takes. 12 days to cure, approximately. Use the Curing Calculator on this page to get the precise timing.

Special tools. You need a 5 gallon food grade bucket or bag to hold the meat and the cure. You can use a very clean plastic beer cooler in a pinch, if it will fit in the fridge.

Ingredients

To scale up or down, do not simply multiply or divide. Please use our curing calculator.

1 whole fresh ham, 15 to 20 pounds with skin and the fat cap removed, about 4" thick at the bottom while laying on its side

3 gallons distilled water

20 ounces by weight of Morton's kosher salt (2 cups)

3 tablespoons Prague Powder #1

1 1/2 cups Chris Lilly's Spicy Apricot Glaze or Danny Gaulden's Brown Sugar Mustard Glaze

Method

1) If your ham has skin, remove it and all the fat cap. You can use the skin to make cracklins. Skin and fat just do not add flavor. I debunk this myth in my article on fat caps. Besides, fat on a ham only slows the penetration of the cure and will get gelatinous after curing like this:

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2) Get a 5 gallon food grade bucket and clean the heck out of it first with soapy water. Rinse thoroughly with ounce of bleach per gallon of water. Dry thoroughly. Then and add the distilled water, kosher salt, and Prague Powder #1. Stir til they dissolve. Chill it.

3) Scrub the exterior of the ham thoroughly to remove as much bacteria as possible (don't use soap). Put the meat in the bucket and submerge it. If a piece of bone sticks out, get the hacksaw and cut it off or add more cure to cover it. If necessary, weight the meat down under a clean plastic container filled with water. Put the bucket in the refrigerator and let the meat cure for at least 7 days. If it is larger or smaller, use our curing calculator on this page to determine how long it needs to be in the cure. It must remain cold. After curing the water should remain transparent, but slightly pink, like this:

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If you don't keep it in the brine long enough, you might have a tan spot that will taste like pork, not ham, like this one.

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4) After the cure, it is time to smoke. Before smoking, rinse the surface since there will be a heavier concentration of salt on there. If you wish, you can apply a salt free spice rub like my Meathead's Memphis Dust just before smoking. If you want to serve it immediately, and I strongly recommend it, smoke the ham at 325°F until it is 145°F in the deepest part of the center. This will take up to 5 hours depending on the meat's thickness. Rule of thumb: 30 minutes per inch of thickness at the thickest part. Your mileage may vary depending on a lot of variables such as your cooker's airflow, humidity, how much moisture in the meat, etc. The reason we cook at 325°F is to prevent the stall which will happen at lower temperatures and that can result in a 12 hour or longer cook. During the last hour, paint it with a glaze. My favorite glazes are Chris Lilly's Spicy Apricot Glaze or Danny Gaulden's Brown Sugar Mustard Glaze. Make sure it doesn't burn. There is no substitute for a ham fresh from the smoker.

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If you don't plan to use it within a week, smoke it at 325°F until it is 165°F in the deepest part and it will be safe for up to two weeks in the fridge. Then when you reheat it cook it up to 145°F and lay down your first layer of glaze when it hits about 130°F. Reheating can take almost as long as the initial smoking.

Leftovers can be stored in the refrigerator for a week or so, or frozen. If you vacuum seal, it will keep longer. You can cut slices and grill ham steaks, or just warm it in the oven.

Nutrition Facts

0 servings per container

Amount Per Serving
Calories650
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 50 g77 %
 Saturated Fat 17 g86 %
 Trans Fat - 
Cholesterol 192 mg64 %
Sodium 142 mg6 %
Total Carbohydrate 1 g0 %
 Dietary Fiber 0 g1 %
 Total Sugars 1 g 
 Includes - Added Sugars 
Protein 46 g92 %
Vitamin D 1 µg9 %
Calcium 28 mg3 %
Iron 2 mg13 %
Potassium 854 mg18 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

"The best cure for insomnia is to get a lot of sleep."W. C. Fields

This is the simplest of all cures. Just salt, nitrite, water, and time. A lot of recipes call for garlic, spices, celery, and more, but they just don't penetrate. I debunk this myth in my article on marinating.

ham in cure

You also need a large container for making the ham. You can use something like a large stainless steel or enamel coated stock pot. Do not use an aluminum pot. It can react with the salt and create off flavors. If you only have an aluminum pot or if your bucket is not food grade, you must line it with a food grade plastic bag such as the Ziploc XL or five gallon food grade bucket liners. A very clean beer cooler will also work.

NOTE ON INJECTING: Once upon a time this recipe recommended injecting the meat with cure, but that made it difficult to use the Curing Calculator properly and we were getting reports from readers who had spots of meat in the center that were not properly cured because of improper injection. If you want to speed things up, you can inject, but inject a lot and make your injections about 1" apart. This will knock about 30% off the curing time, but I can't guarantee that.

You should also read my articles on the science of hams and my article on cooking ham on the grill.

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