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Meathead: The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling

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Beware The "Lasagna Cell": How Some Metals Can Ruin Your Meal And When Even A Non-Reactive Pan Can Be A Hazard

"It happened when marinating meat overnight. I take the foil off and everywhere the meat touched the foil there is a hole in the foil, and silver liquid on the meat. I'm stumped." Matt

Beware of reactive pans and be afraid of the lasagna cell.

Reactive pots and pans made of aluminum, cast iron, hammered steel, brass, or copper can react with some chemicals in foods, especially the acids and salts in sauces, brines, and marinades, and they can undergo a chemical reaction and create off flavors, and in rare cases, are toxic.

Non-reactive containers made of stainless steel, glass, porcelain, and enamel will not change when subjected to foods. Plastic is also non-reactive, but it can also absorb flavors and be stained by sauces.

Perhaps the most extreme example is the lasagna cell. Lasagna lovers often are appalled when they open the fridge or oven and find holes in the foil on top of the pan and black spots on their dinner.

They are not alone. Cooks who put meat in a marinade in a steel pan and cover it with aluminum foil overnight can wake up the next morning horrified to see that the foil has holes in it and cry for help in our comments section.

Sometimes barbecue cooks who use the "Texas crutch", a technique of wrapping their meat in aluminum foil to combat a phenomenon known as "the stall" (when evaporation from the meat cools its surface and stops it from cooking), are shocked to find holes in the foil and juices leaking out when they use a steel pan and foil for the crutch.

What has happened is an electrochemical reaction called galvanic corrosion, dissimilar metal reaction.

For a better understanding of the process, I asked the AmazingRibs.com science advisor Dr. Greg Blonder. He explained that the cook has essentially created a small battery, a cell, and the electric current running through it has etched away one of the battery's electrodes. Huh?

"All batteries consist of two electrodes, the anode and the cathode, separated by a conducting material called an electrolyte. The electrolyte carries electrons from one electrode in one direction, and waste products scavenged from the other electrode, in the other direction. A car battery has a negatively charged lead electrode (the anode) on one side, positively charged lead oxide is the second electrode (the cathode), and sulfuric acid is the electrolyte".

So how does a pan of lasagna become a battery? "An acid such as vinegar or tomato sauce and electrically charged atoms like salt form the electrolyte. Aluminum foil is one electrode, and the pan, often steel or different alloy of aluminum, is the second electrode. This causes the aluminum foil to pit and dissolve, and you shouldn't ingest gravy filled with metal ions".

Blonder says "A corrosion cell is possible across two different brands of foil, between aluminum foil and a steel baking pan, and even inside a aluminum foil pouch if the acidity or temperature varies across its length. Any chemical activity difference produces an electrical current and then corrossion."

The same thing can happen in a pan of marinade or brine. It can happen in the fridge, but the reaction occurs faster at oven temperatures. Blonder says "I always cook lasagna in a pyrex pan, and store in the fridge covered with saran first, and foil on top. Otherwise the foil will be pitted wherever it touches the tomato sauce. You may not always notice the small holes unless you hold the foil up to the light".

And he warns the barbecue cook, "You can also form a battery between an aluminum foil wrapped piece of meat, the drippings, and a stainless steel thermometer cable. Weird but true". Can you damage the thermometer probe by contact with foil? "Very unlikely" he says. Stainless is covered with an inert chrome oxide layer, which protects it from rusting and damage. No stain, no pain." Click here for more on stainless steel.

What about the foil in contact with grill grates? "Generally, the grates are pretty dry when hot and will not set up a corrosion cell even if the foil leaks juices" he says. For smoking, the safest solution is to crutch in a lightly closed plastic Reynolds oven bag, butcher paper, or parchment paper, then foil. Blondere warns "Never cook in Saran Wrap. It is not designed for continuous use at boiling temperatures."

Another option is cooking on an insulated grate such as teflon frog mats or enameled coated grates.

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Please read this before posting a comment or question

grouchy?1) Please use the table of contents or the search box at the top of every page before you ask for help, then please post your question on the appropriate page.

2) Please tell us everything we need to know to answer your question such as the type of cooker and thermometer you are using. Dial thermometers are often off by as much as 50°F so if you are not using a good digital thermometer we probably can't help you. Please read this article about thermometers.

3) If you post a photo, wait a minute for a thumbnail to appear. It will happen even if you don't see it happen.

4) Click here to learn more about our comment system and our privacy promise. Remember, your login info for comments is probably different from your Pitmaster Club login info if you are a member.

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About this website. AmazingRibs.com is all about the science of barbecue, grilling, and outdoor cooking, with great BBQ recipes, tips on technique, science, mythbusting, and unbiased equipment reviews. Learn how to set up your grills and smokers properly, the thermodynamics of what happens when heat hits meat, and how to cook great food outdoors. There are also buying guides to hundreds of barbeque smokers, grills, accessories, and thermometers, as well as hundreds of excellent tested recipes including all the classics: Baby back ribs, pulled pork, Texas brisket, burgers, chicken, smoked turkey, lamb, steaks, chili, barbecue sauces, spice rubs, and side dishes, with the world's best all edited by Meathead Goldwyn.

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