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lamb cuts

Lamb Cuts

"If you love beef and don't love lamb, then you've never had it cooked properly." Meathead

If you say you don't like lamb, you probably really mean you don't like the preparation of lamb you were served. If you have never savored the rich, tender, beefy (never gamey) flavor of a lamb loin chop or rack of lamb, served medium rare, no mint jelly allowed, you are missing what I consider to be the best nugget of red meat in the world. Period. Really. No cow poop.

Lamb is much smaller and leaner than pork and beef, so there are fewer cuts of interest to the backyard cook. And lamb is much different than mutton which comes from older animals. As with beef, the best cuts are from the back of the animal.

Rack. This is a section of eight ribs with the loin meat attached, the same cut as bone-in prime rib of beef or pork crown roast. Only lamb loins are much narrower in diameter. But the meat is heavenly.

rack of lamb

Rib Chops. Cut between the ribs for lollipop like chops. I think the best prep is to cut every second rib making double wide chops (below). Marbled, tender, juicy, grilled to medium rare, they are simply spectacular. Click here for my recipe for Herbed Rack Of Lamb Lollipops.

lamb chops

Saddles. You can order a lamb hind saddle, which is both legs connected to the spine and running all the way up through the sirloin. You can also order a rib saddle, which is a rib cage from the spine half way down the side, including the ribeye. Next best thing to cooking a whole lamb.

Ribs. Some butchers actually sell the front seven ribs in a slab with the loin muscle removed. Not exactly a he-man meal, there is not much meat on them and a lot of fat. I don't recommend them.

Loins and Loin Chops. From just behind the rib section comes the loin, home of the most amazing porterhouse and T-bone type cuts. They are best when cut thick, have a bit of fat to be trimmed, and an adult serving is a minimum of three chops because they are so small, but they possess some of the most tender and flavorful meat I know on any animal. Photo below. Click her for my recipe for Lamb Loin Chops In Sheep Dip.

lamb loin chops

Legs. Cone shaped, lamb hind legs are a twisted mass of muscles, sinew, and fat, but the whole leg can be roasted, with or without smoke, and you get a whole range of doneness from well done at the tapered end by the shank, to rare at the hip end, if you wish. Or you can take the leg apart, remove the bone, and cut it into chunks that make great grilling. The leg can be cut crosswise into steaks, but they can be tough. You can also bone a lamb leg and get a huge flat slab of meat, but it will be uneven in thickness, and in the process hunks start falling off. You can buy boneless legs like the one below held together in something sort of tube shaped by netting or string. Click here for my recipe for Grill Roasted Leg Of Lamb With A Lick Of Smoke.

leg of lamb

Shoulder. Another group of complex muscles that can be cut into arm chops and blade chops, but is better roasted whole or chunked for grilling. Some butchers sell boneless shoulders wrapped in mesh. Below is a whole shoulder I cooked in the same fashion as a pork shoulder, smoked low and slow for hours. Click here for my recipe for Kentucky Smoked Lamb or Mutton with Sunlite Black Sauce.

lamb_shoulder

Stew and kabab meat. If you don't want to cook a whole lamb or shoulder, take the whole jugsaw puzzle apart, trim off the excess fat and sinew, and then cut the muscles into large chunks about 2" square. Grill them like kebabs, but without the metal skewer. If you cut the chunks too small it is impossible to get a dark exterior and all the rich flavors that come with it without overcooking the interior. Click here for my recipe for Binghamton Spiedies or Lamb Mechoui.

lamb chunks

Shank. About the same size as turkey drumsticks, they are usually braised in a flavorful liquid.

Ground Lamb. If you like hamburger, you'll love lamburger. Click here for Mary's Little Lamburgers.

lamburger

 

lamb cuts

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About this website. AmazingRibs.com is all about the science of barbecue, grilling, and outdoor cooking, with great BBQ recipes, tips on technique, mythbusting, and unbiased equipment reviews. Learn how to set up your grills and smokers properly, the thermodynamics of what happens when heat hits meat, and how to cook great food outdoors. There are also buying guides to barbeque smokers, grills, accessories, and thermometers, as well as hundreds of excellent tested recipes including all the classics: Baby back ribs, pulled pork, Texas brisket, burgers, chicken, smoked turkey, lamb, steaks, chili, barbecue sauces, spice rubs, and side dishes, with the world's best all edited by Meathead Goldwyn.

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