Simon & Garfunkel Spice Rub For Poultry Recipe

NOTE: We originally called this Simon & Garfunkel Rub, but decided to rename it rather than risk a letter from their lawyer. But we were then advised we were safe because it is a recipe and a tribute, not a commercial product. So it it is back to Simon & Garfunkel. Whew!

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How'd Simon & Garfunkel Rub get its name? In 1966 Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel popularized their modified version of a haunting 16th Century English canticle on their album named "Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme". The name comes from the song "Scarborough Fair" and the tale of a young soldier asking a favor of a friend who is going to Scarborough Fair. The Fair was a large harvest market on the east coast. The young swain asks the friend to find his old girlfriend and ask her, if she wishes to be his true love, to perform several impossible tasks, including the planting of parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme on an acre of land she must plow with the horn of a lamb and then harvest the crop with a sickle of leather. We don't know if she complied (we hope not). We do not know if he knew much about women (we think not), but he clearly knew something about cooking. Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme are said to represent bitterness, strength, faithfulness, and courage, and they also make a pretty good all purpose BBQ rub (click here for my recipe for Simon & Garfunkel Chicken). 

Here's an excerpt. This is one cocky dude, no?

Love imposes impossible tasks,
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,
Though not more than any heart asks,
And I must know she's a true love of mine.
Dear, when thou has finished thy task,
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,
Come to me, my hand for to ask,
For thou then art a true love of mine.

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This wonderful spice blend goes on chicken, turkey, grilled potatoes, even on the outside of baked potatoes, grilled asparagus, and in omelets. I make up a batch of my Simon & Garfunkel Fair spice blend, store it for months, and sprinkle it on everything bird sigh. It goes on chicken, turkey, grilled potatoes, even on the outside of baked potatoes, grilled asparagus, on eggs, even pork, you name it. As background for this recipe, please read my article on the Science of Rubs.

Course. Sauces and Condiments.

Cuisine. American.

Makes. About 1/4 cup, enough for about 8 large whole chickens

Preparation time. 10 minutes

Ingredients

1 tablespoon dried crushed parsley

2 tablespoons dried crushed sage

1 tablespoon dried crushed rosemary

1 tablespoon dried crushed thyme

1 tablespoon dried crushed oregano

1 tablespoon dried crushed basil

1 tablespoon dried crushed bay leaf

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 tablespoon sugar

Where's the salt? I have left the salt out of this recipe. Read why in my article on the Science of Rubs.

Measuring. Measuring the ingredients is a bit tricky since some of the herb leaves may be powdered, not crushed. The big chunks, like oregano have more air in them, so try to compensate by adding more or less depending on how much air in your raw materials. If your measurements are not precise or if you lack one or two ingredients, no wars will break out, but I think the sage, bay leaf, and rosemary are essential. Crushed bay leaf may be hard to find so you can use whole bay leaves. Just take about 10 leaves and crumble them in your hand, measure the crumbled amount and add more if necessary. The pepper will add a little heat, but not much, but you can cut it out if you're a wimp or amp it up if you're a tough guy.

Optional. At one time I had included 1 tablespoon dried crushed hot red pepper (cayenne or chipotle) in this recipe. I have removed it because I decided I like the recipe better without the heat. If you want a capsaicin jolt, go for it.

Method

1) Measure everything and dump it into a blender. Put the lid on the blender (very important), and run it on medium for a few seconds, turn it off, and run it again. Continue pulsing about until you have a powder. Dump the whole thing in a jar and label it.

2) How to use this stuff. If the food has not been been brined, then sprinkle with salt, 1/2 teaspoon per pound. If it has been brined, then skip the salt. Lightly coat your chicken or potatoes or asparagus or whatever with water (the ingredients dissolve better in water than oil), sprinkle on the rub liberally, even if you are a conservative. If time permits, let the seasoned meat sit in the fridge for an hour or three.

3) Grill, smoke, or roast.

"Are you going to Scarborough Fair? Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, Remember me to one who lives there, She once was a true love of mine."Simon & Garfunkel

Meathead Goldwyn

Meathead is the founder and publisher of AmazingRibs.com, and is also known as the site's Hedonism Evangelist and BBQ Whisperer. He is also the author of "Meathead, The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling", a New York Times Best Seller and named one of the "100 Best Cookbooks of All Time" by Southern Living.

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