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Try This Charoses Recipe, A Delicious Jewish Applesauce That’s Even Great with Pork!

Apple with the ends cut off

Charoses (a.k.a. charoset, haroset, haroseth) is a traditional Jewish dish served during the spring feast of Passover. From a culinary standpoint, it is one of the world’s great applesauces or chutneys although Jews never think of it as such, a fine accompaniment to the traditional Passover lamb or brisket, and, Heaven forgive me, it’s a great side dish for pork chops. By the way, has anybody else noticed how many great BBQ chefs are Jews?

The original recipe for Charoses was created thousands of years ago as an integral part, I think the best part, of the Passover Seder. The Seder is a ritual evening meal Jews eat in large family groups to celebrate the Old Testament story of Exodus, the liberation of their ancestors from the Egyptians by Moses, the 40 years of wandering in the desert, and presentation of the 10 Commandments.

The meal contains several required dishes meant to symbolize the events in the biblical story:

Charoses, the applesauce, represents the mortar and bricks the slaves used to build Egyptian homes and monuments. It comes from the Hebrew word cheres, which means clay.

Matzo, a cracker that is similar to the unleavened bread Jews ate as they ran from Egypt in the desert.

Karpas, a green vegetable such as parsley, symbolic of spring, that is dipped in salt water representing tears.

Z’roa, a bone, usually a lamb shank, to remind them of the lamb that was sacrificed and its blood swabbed on the doorways of Jews so the angel of death would pass over (hence, Passover).

Maror, horseradish to remind them of the bitterness of slavery.

Beitzah, a roasted egg which symbolizes, depending on the rabbi you ask, either mourning, or the rebirth of the Jewish people, or the loss of the Temple of Jerusalem, which is a lot of responsibility for one egg.

Kiddush, four glasses of wine are blessed as symbols of blood.

There are numerous recipes for charoses depending on which part of the diaspora your bubbe’s (grandmother’s) family came from, and not surprisingly, learned rabbis argue about every detail: What must be in it, what must not be in it, how to make it, and how it is to be served. I fully expect complaints that, in my charoses recipe, I have not chopped the apples fine enough to make it look like mortar. Oy!

The main course of the dinner is often brisket, a cheap, tough cut of beef that some peasants could afford for holidays. Most Jews braise it in liquid, but in Texas, smoke-roasted barbecue beef brisket is the choice of goys (non-Jews) year round. No reason it can’t be used for Passover now that barbecue season has begun. Another common Seder dish is potato pancakes, called latkes, and they also go great with barbecue.

Charoses tastes just fine as soon as you make it, but it improves with a day or two of age as the apples and raisins absorb the wine and spice flavors. It is traditionally served on matzo (I’m partial to Streit’s Lightly Salted Matzo). If you’re not Jewish and you can’t find matzo, Carr’s Table Water Crackers are very similar and widely available.

Easy Jewish Charoses Applesauce Recipe


charoses
Tried this recipe?Tell others what you thought of it and give it a star rating below.
2.4 from 20 votes
My version of Charoses was inspired by a recipe from my friend Sharon Eisenberg's friend's grandmother-in-law. Really. Let it age overnight to improve the flavors.

Course:
Appetizer
,
Dinner
,
Salad
,
Side Dish
Cuisine:
American
,
Jewish

Makes:

Servings: 8

Takes:

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted walnuts
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ¼ teaspoon powdered ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • cup red wine
  • 2 pinches Morton coarse kosher salt
  • 3 large apples
Notes:
About the apples. Go for crisp, tart, crunchy apples like Braeburn, Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, or Sweet Delicious.
About the wine. In the US it is traditional to use sweet Concord wine. I prefer Manischewitz to Mogen David. If you can't bring yourself to buy sweet Concord wine, I recommend a ruby port or a young grapey Beaujolais with another tablespoon of honey. If you wish, you can even substititute non-alcoholic grape juice. Interestingly, if you tell American Jews that the Concord is native to North American and it is never used in Israel or Europe, they are shocked and will usually not believe you.
Optional mix-ins. There are slight differences in the charoses around the world where the locals take advantage of local ingredients. Some recipes use chopped pitted dates, chopped dried apricots, chopped almonds, pine nuts, orange zest, hazel nuts, and lemon juice.
Metric conversion:

These recipes were created in US Customary measurements and the conversion to metric is being done by calculations. They should be accurate, but it is possible there could be an error. If you find one, please let us know in the comments at the bottom of the page

Method

  • Prep. Finely chop the walnuts, then mix them with raisins, ginger, cin, honey, wine, and salt in a bowl.
  • Peel the apple. Cut it in quarters and remove the core and stems. Chop into bits about the size of a pea and mix them in. To make it more of a paste, you can chop the apples in a food processor or mash them in the bowl, just be careful not to turn them into mush. Taste and add more of anything you wish.
  • Serve. If possible, age for a few hours or overnight. Serve on matzoh or as a side dish.

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Published On: 4/25/2015 Last Modified: 4/16/2021

  • Meathead - Founder and publisher of AmazingRibs.com, Meathead is known as the site's Hedonism Evangelist and BBQ Whisperer. He is also the author of the New York Times Best Seller "Meathead, The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling", named one of the "100 Best Cookbooks of All Time" by Southern Living.


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The Priest and the Rabbi confess

Although charoses and latkes are great with ribs, pork is forbidden in the homes of observant Jews because it violates their Kosher dietary laws. But that doesn’t mean all kosher Jews have never tasted ribs…

So the rabbi gets on the airplane and is pleasantly surprised to find he is seated next to a Catholic priest. He introduces himself, and they begin a conversation. After a while the priest turns to the rabbi, lowers his voice, and says “Tell me rabbi, I don’t know much about your religion. Is it true you are not allowed to eat pork?”

The rabbi chuckles and says that, yes, it is true, he is not allowed to eat pork. He explains the laws of kosher.

The priest is both puzzled and amused. He leans toward the rabbi and asks “Have you really gone your whole life without pork? Have you never tried it once, just out of curiosity?”

The rabbi is silent for a moment and then whispers “Well, yes, I did try ribs once, just out of curiosity.”

“Did you like it?”

“Oh, my, yes, I had ribs on a business trip to Memphis at Corky’s. They were wonderful! Did you know the owners of Corky’s are Jewish? I wish I could eat their pork all the time! Now you tell me Father, is it true that you are not allowed to have sex?”

“Yes, it is true. I am married to the church.”

“Tell me honestly Father. Have you never tried it, just once, just out of curiosity?”

The priest is silent for a moment, and realizing that his god already knew the truth, he whispered to his new friend “I must confess, I have had sex, but only once, with a nun.”

There was an awkward silence for a few moments, and finally the rabbi looks the priest in the eyes and quietly asks “Did you like it?”

“Not as much as ribs” was the reply.

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