Salting, Brining, Curing, And Injecting

If you like your meat juicy, tender, and flavorful, there is one simple ingredient that can improve all three: Salt.
 
Salt, which is another name for the mineral sodium chloride (NaCl), is probably the oldest way to flavor food and essential to all living things. Our bodies require salt, and the only way to get it is to ingest it. All our bodily fluids, blood and tears, contain salt. Our nervous system requires salt to conduct electricity.
 
Salting and brining can significantly improve your cooking. Salt is unlike any spice and herb in the house physically and chemically, and it behaves in strange and wonderful ways when applied properly to food. Don't overdo it and you have nothing to fear from salt. And when used judiciously in can seriously amplify flavor without changing it, and it can help protein hold onto moisture.

"Salt is the magic rock."

Meathead
spit jack injector
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Our dining table is always set with a pepper mill, a table salt shaker, and a small bowl with Seasoned Sea Salt. It is easy to make and the large... read more
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turkey brine
If you like your meat juicy, tender, and flavorful, there is one simple ingredient that can improve all three: Salt. Salt, which is another name for... read more

different salts

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