How to Cook A Steak Like A Pro (cont'd)

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Sorry folks: searing meat to seal in the juices is a myth. Of course, searing meat has other benefits, most notably creating the delicious flavors of browned meat! Here are the facts about meat juices, searing, browning, and a better way to sear your meat called the reverse sear. read more
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Grilled bison steaks have never tasted better thanks to the sous-vide-que cooking method, combining the moistness and tenderness of sous vide with the smoky BBQ char from the grill. By poaching the bison ribeye in butter during the sous vide bath, this lean meat is both flavorful and juicy. It's sheer steak bliss. read more
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Crusty on the outside and juicy on the inside, this recipe for grilled flank steak is a great alternative to more pricey beef cuts such as ribeyes. Because they are thin, hot and fast cooking over direct heat is key to perfect flank steak. This is a great cut for a flavorful board sauce or chimichurri sauce. read more
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Stop trying to get perfect grill marks! Yes, grill marks make us drool, but they are a sign of lost potential. Fact: the most flavorful meat has the most browning across its entire surface, not just a few browned stripes. Let's bust that myth. Read on to find out how to make the most flavorful browned crust on meat. read more
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Here is an outstanding recipe for Caprese Flank Steak from Attjack, a member of our Pitmaster Club. This recipe combines a classic Italian Caprese salad with grilled flank steak in a butterflied and rolled steak cut into pinwheels and grilled hot and fast. Salad, meet grill. Grill, salad. read more
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Discover truly delicious chuck steak thanks to this simple, but flavor rich, recipe. Chuck steak is a relatively cheap solution to a weeknight family meal and adding a delicious red wine based marinade makes it extra tasty. Finish the chuck on the grill for that true BBQ flavor and dive into the delicious results! read more
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Say so long to the thick brown steak sauce found at your local grocer and hello to a more flavorful homemade version. Created by cookbook author Brigit Binns, this is the real deal, providing a far deeper, richer, more complex, and bright alternative to A-1 and others. Try it on burgers, meatloaf, and so much more. read more
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A fresh and bright board sauce recipe is a great way to add an additional depth of flavor to grilled steak. A technique that was created by Chef Adam Perry Lang, board dressings feature fresh herbs and olive oil that are painted on the cutting board, allowing the flavors to meld with the meat's juices as it's sliced. read more
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Stop worrying about resting meat after it is cooked. Serve it hot. We bust this myth with a review of the scientific research, some tests of our own, some basic meat science, explanations of carryover cooking and what makes meat juicy, a look at doneness temperatures, and how carving comes into play. read more
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I love these bamboo steak markers as they are a great tool when trying to keep track of which steaks are cooked to what degree of doneness. They come in a pack of 500 and include five temperatures: rare, medium rare, medium, medium well, and well. Unless charred, they can be washed and reused. read more
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Some steaks have the undertone flavor of liver. There are several factors that cause it. read more
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Our mouthwatering chimichurri sauce recipe is the perfect way to liven up grilled beef, chicken, fish, and more. In addition to the traditional Argentinian combination of fresh parsley, olive oil, garlic, and salt, our recipe takes it over the top with the addition of bright and lively lemon juice. read more
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YouTube BBQ star Malcom Reed joins us again with his super simple, super delicious recipe for elk steak. Season it with salt and pepper, sear it in a cast iron pan over hot coals, then add some butter, garlic, and rosemary, basting the steak with melted butter as it cooks. Doesn't get much easier--or better--than that! read more

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Dave Joachim

AmazingRibs.com Editor David Joachim has authored, edited, or collaborated on more than 45 cookbooks including four on barbecue and grilling, making him a perfect match for a website dedicated to the “Science of Barbecue and Grilling.” His Food Science column has appeared in "Fine Cooking" magazine since 2011. 

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TIP: PAINT YOUR STEAK WITH BEEF FAT

A perfectly seared and browned steak is a thing of beauty. Ever wonder how steakhouses get that all-over mahogany color and deep, beefy flavor? Answer: beef fat. If you have some rendered beef fat in the back of your freezer, carve out a chunk and melt it the next time you're cooking a steak. Follow the steps in this article for cooking a steak like a pro. Then, at the very end during the final sear, paint your steak with melted beef fat. The fat helps transfer heat to all the nooks and crannies of the protein, creating a beautiful reddish-brown color. And it really knocks the meaty flavor up a level.   

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