BBQ & Grilling Technique, Science, And Mythbusting

"Nothing can teach you better about quality than attempting to produce it."Meathead

Good cooking needs more than good recipes. The best chefs understand "why" as well as "how" and they have developed tricks and techniques that can make major differences in the outcome. Here is more of the science behind cooking and some of our favorite tips and tricks that make cooking easier, and the outcome better.

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What is meat and how does cooking alter it? Discover the science of what meat is made of, including water, fat, protein, connective tissue, salt, and other minerals. And find out what happens when meat meets heat. read more
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"Tender at the bone" is a common phrase in cooking. It leads many cooks to believe that bone-in meat tastes better than boneless meat. Is it true? Do bones add flavor to meat or somehow make meat more tender near the bone? We have the answers, and they may surprise you. read more
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Grades of beef explained: Choice, Prime, Wagyu, Certified Angus, Kobe, aged, grass fed, grain fed, organic, natural, kosher, and halal. read more
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Here is how to dry age and wet age beef at home and save a lot of money in the process. read more
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Removing the paper-thin membrane from the bone side of ribs prior to smoking ensures that the ribs come out as tender as possible without guests having to gnaw through the membrane's tough texture. This how-to guide features step by step photos for trimming a slab of ribs and removing the membrane. read more
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Here are four offbeat methods for cooking steaks that work amazingly well: The Afterburner Method where you cook on a hot charcoal chimney, the Vigneron Method where you cook with twigs, the Caveman Method where you cook right on hot coals, and the Stripsteak Method where you sous vide in butter then sear on a grill. read more
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Do not bring your meat to room temperature before cooking it. That is a myth that poses a food safety risky. Letting meat sit at room temperature for a few minutes may be OK, but it's safer and better to simply take your meat from the refrigerator to the cooker. Here's why. read more
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Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are among the most popular meats in America. But they have a problem. One side is thick and one is thin, so they don't cook evenly. Pounding chicken breasts flat solves a lot of cooking and serving problems. Here's how to make an even piece of meat quickly and easily. read more
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Here's how to thaw or defrost meat safely. Surprisingly, you can do it in hot water! That method works best for thinner cuts of meat. For thicker cuts, find out what works best, including thawing in the refrigerator and in cold water. It's all food safety and preserving precious meat juices. read more
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What influences cooking time? So many variables, such as the total volume of meat in your cooker. Are you using rib racks to squeeze more meat into a small area? Beware. The meat is almost touching, and that could add up to an hour of cooking time. Here are more tips on cooking more than one hunk of meat at once. read more
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Spatchcocking, or butterflying, a whole turkey, chicken or any other bird is a great way to make moist, delicious birds that are browned all over and evenly cooked in less time. It's a simple matter of cutting out the bird's backbone, a deboning process that is easy and painless with good kitchen or poultry shears. read more
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Most RV kitchens are tiny. But with some planning and key pieces of equipment, you can turn our world class BBQ while traveling. Check out these key tips from our resident thermometer guru and avid RV traveler, Bill McGrath. read more
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January is National Meat Month and Americans are eating more meat, looking to get more protein and fewer carbs in their diets. Here are our top 5 meat cooking tips from our own bbq whisperer, Meathead Goldwyn. read more
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Sharp knives cut. Dull knives slip. Stay safe by keeping your knife sharp. Here's a guide to honing and sharpening your knife using a honing steel and sharpening stones. read more
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So you're cooking for a crowd. How much food do you need? Here's how to plan for a party or special occasion, including some basic rules of thumb and tips on how to handle dietary restrictions, how to prep ahead, and how to calculate the right amount of food so no one goes hungry. read more

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Meathead Goldwyn

Meathead is the founder and publisher of AmazingRibs.com, and is also known as the site's Hedonism Evangelist and BBQ Whisperer. He is also the author of "Meathead, The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling", a New York Times Best Seller and named one of the "100 Best Cookbooks of All Time" by Southern Living.

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